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Texas A&M AgriLife Extension

Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Residue Avoidance

HOUSTON LIVESTOCK SHOW™ RESIDUE AVOIDANCE

Why is it important to drug test junior livestock projects?
• To protect the safety of the food supply
• To foster fair competition

What is my responsibility as a CEA, AST, parent or exhibitor?

KNOW THE RULES before you enter any livestock show. These can be found in the Exhibitor Handbook, located on the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo website. When you sign the indemnification form, that is required for entry, you are agreeing to have read and to abide by all rules in the handbook.

What are the HLSR residue avoidance rules?
In short, the Houston Livestock Show maintains a Zero Tolerance policy which means if positive results are reported, we have an obligation to investigate in order to determine what circumstances led to this result.
• Zero Tolerance is based on the elimination period, rather than the withdrawal period. There is a difference. The withdrawal period is the amount of time that must pass for consumed products to be safe. The elimination period is the amount of time it takes for all residue to be eliminated from and animal’s system. For most drugs, the elimination period is longer than the withdrawal period.
• Unapproved drugs are prohibited. Unapproved means not approved by the Food and Drug Administration and/or the U.S. Department of Agriculture for slaughter animals that may be destined for human consumption. This includes the use of all products that are not FDA approved including but not limited to any diuretic, unapproved growth stimulant or other unapproved medication meant for human usage.
*Products labeled “all natural” that are not FDA approved may contain ingredients that can result in a positive test.

What are best practices for a show animal that falls sick leading up to the show.
• Do not administer any medications before consulting with your veterinarian and make certain that both you and the veterinarian are aware of show rules. Consider the amount of time prior to arrival at the show and assume that the elimination period is longer than the labeled withdrawal period. Make an informed decision. The welfare of the animal takes priority over competition, meaning that the best decision may be to leave the project at home.
• Document all treatment records. If the animal is treated with an approved drug and withdrawal times are observed, maintain official record of treatment from the veterinarian, including date of administration and dosage.

If I receive a positive test, am I automatically banned for life?
• Each case is handled on an individual basis. Exhibitors found in violation are offered an opportunity to explain the details of their case in a formal appeals hearing. Penalties range from withholding premiums to a lifetime ban, depending on the drug that was used and the circumstances surrounding use.

What types of drugs will I be penalized for?

• Antibacterial Therapeutic Medications
Used to treat infection, these compounds don’t create competitive advantage, but can create food safety concerns if not used according to label directions. Many are only FDA approved for particular species, meaning that extensive research has been conducted regarding the proper dosage and type of administration to be efficacious in that species as well as the withdrawal time that is necessary for meat products to be safe for human consumption.

• Non-Antibiotic Therapeutic Medications
Inclusive of anti-inflammatories, antipyretics, diuretics and anesthetics, these medications can result in competitive advantage by altering the physical appearance of the animal and/or concerns with food safety. Some are available over the counter and others can only be legally sourced and administered through prescription by a licensed veterinarian. Many are only FDA approved for particular species and use in any other species without a prescription by a veterinarian is illegal.

• Beta-agonists
Originally developed as bronchodilators in humans, larger dosages have a growth promoting effect in animals and result in increased muscle and decreased fat. The only beta-agonist that is currently FDA approved and available for use in livestock production is ractopamine, which is approved for use in market cattle, market swine and market turkeys with a zero day withdrawal (i.e. research indicates that meat products are safe for consumption at any time during the feeding period). Use of ractopamine in any other species or class within species, or any beta-agonist lacking animal approval in any species, is illegal and creates concerns with both food safety and competitive advantage. Please note any exceptions to the use of beta-agonists below:

Market Animals
Zilpaterol Hydrochloride (Zilmax®)
THE HOUSTON LIVESTOCK SHOW WILL NOT TOLERATE THE PRESENCE OF ZILPATEROL HYDROCHLORIDE (Zilmax®) IN THE URINE OF MARKET STEERS. Further, the Show will not tolerate the presence of Zilpaterol Hydrochloride (Zilmax®) in any other market species or breeding animal.

Topmax™
THE HOUSTON LIVESTOCK SHOW WILL NOT TOLERATE THE PRESENCE OF RACTOPAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE (Topmax®) IN MARKET POULTRY. The use of this compound will be governed by the Junior Show Rules published in the 2017 Exhibitor Handbook.

The use of all other drugs in junior market animals, both unapproved and FDA approved, will be governed by the Junior Show Rules published in the 2017 Exhibitor Handbook.

Ractopamine Hydrochloride (Optaflexx™ and Paylean®)
The Houston Livestock Show will not be testing for the presence of ractopamine hydrochloride in steers (Optaflexx™) or market barrows (Paylean®). Exhibitors who choose to use these products are expected to follow all label directions. The Show will not tolerate the presence of ractopamine hydrochloride in species, or classes within species, for which they are not FDA approved.

The use of all other drugs in junior market and breeding animals, both unapproved and FDA approved, will be governed by the Junior Show Rules published in the 2017 Exhibitor Handbook, http://www.rodeohouston.com/Get-Involved/Exhibitors-Participants/Livestock-Show.

Breeding Animals
The Houston Livestock Show™ will not be testing for the presence of antibiotics/antibacterials that have been FDA approved for the species and class of breeding animal in which they are administered. The use of all other drugs in junior breeding animals, both unapproved and FDA approved, will be governed by the Junior Show Rules published in the 2017 Exhibitor Handbook.

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